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A serious attempt at 1/35 faces.

ausf

Master at Arms
No excuses anymore, I'm putting in the time to learn this.

Starting with the eyes, I skipped primer and sprayed a light coat of very thin Vallejo Natural Flesh with the Iwata HP-AH, 2mm @ under 10 PSI.

Next I defined the eyes with Ivory using a Series 7 000 brush. Then black for the iris shape, brown and then a coat of Future to seal it so I can remove the inevitable mistakes after.

An iris highlight and pupil defining, took a few attempts, then another coat of Future followed by defining the lower lid and surrounding area.

Off the the rest later.
IMG_3114.JPGIMG_3115.JPGIMG_3116.jpgIMG_3117.JPGIMG_3119.JPGIMG_3123.JPGIMG_3128.JPGIMG_3132.JPG
 

JamesOLeary

Master at Arms
I was wondering how you were able to see well enough to be able to paint the eyes with that much detail in 1/35th scale. I just might have to invest in such a microscope.
I will be watching how this face turns out.
Cheers,
James
 

Heavens Eagle

Well-known member
The eyes look awesome Jeff! You even managed the pink and blue shadowing around them.






I have a similar scope Jeff. I bought mine for doing watch repair. Have not used it for such, but it sure comes in handy for hobby stuff.
Mine uses some mini halogens and I can light it underneath or from top and vary the brightness. It also has a third eye to add a camera for photos.

Microscope.jpg

It does take a little (LOT?) of practice to calibrate your hands to work under it. The hardest part is getting the work piece, then the tweezers, paint brush, tool both lined up in the view piece. It isn't perfect, but it is a huge improvement over Optivosors or even watchmaker loupes.

I used mine to put all the little diamond parts on the 1/72 flap frames on this Dornier flap. It was a lot easier when I could see the parts.

Flap diamonds.JPG

They were pretty much impossible until I went to the microscope.
 

ausf

Master at Arms
Thanks guys.

Nice one Paul. Mine has the third port, it's just not installed on that earlier photo. I ended up getting an adapter for my Canon as opposed to a camera specific to it and I'm glad I did because live view on the Rebel gives me a lot of control. Those photos were taken with it.

I made my own light ring using LEDs. I went with white (6000K), but all my shop lights are warm white so there's a disparity when I take photos without. I prefer the white light for proper color.

Heres the 1/35 MG gunner under the shop light with an extension tube:

ta2.jpg

And under the scope with the white LEDs:

ta3.jpg
 

bob letterman

Master at Arms
Staff member
Fantastic Jeff,

You say you're going to learn how to do this????? It looks like you've been doing this scale all your life!

The blown up photos are fantastic!

Bob
 

ausf

Master at Arms
Thanks all.

Saul, that's why I did this without primer, when I primed it first, the entire face was covered with those. It may not be visible to the naked eye, but under magnification, the tiniest overspray looked like 80 grit sandpaper. While it may not make a difference with some methods, my way of using super thin paint requires the basecoat to be dead flat and well cured.

Bob, I'm no stranger to painting, I used to do a lot of portraits and murals when I was kid and alwyas had access to a host of materials. While I don't do it with any frequency anymore, it just comes natural and whenever I do paint, I immediate wish I did it more. Scary thing is since I've got back into modeling as an adult, I have yet to finish a figure except those three 1/8 ones (aurora Mummy and the two Munsters). I've only tried a few attempts at 1/35 or 1/16 and just got frustrated handling the paint. That's why I want to get serious about it and come up with a method that works for me. I'm convinced the writing is on the wall with sculpting, at least for any type of military figure. 3D scanning has made it obsolete IMO. Plus the new digital version of recasting makes it a losing battle at this point. At least when it was resin copies made physically and shipped, there was some recourse, but now just email files of copies to be printed, it's game over. I'll just paint at this point, can't copy that and sculpt solely for my own pleasure.
 

bob letterman

Master at Arms
Staff member
Thanks all.

Saul, that's why I did this without primer, when I primed it first, the entire face was covered with those. It may not be visible to the naked eye, but under magnification, the tiniest overspray looked like 80 grit sandpaper. While it may not make a difference with some methods, my way of using super thin paint requires the basecoat to be dead flat and well cured.

Bob, I'm no stranger to painting, I used to do a lot of portraits and murals when I was kid and alwyas had access to a host of materials. While I don't do it with any frequency anymore, it just comes natural and whenever I do paint, I immediate wish I did it more. Scary thing is since I've got back into modeling as an adult, I have yet to finish a figure except those three 1/8 ones (aurora Mummy and the two Munsters). I've only tried a few attempts at 1/35 or 1/16 and just got frustrated handling the paint. That's why I want to get serious about it and come up with a method that works for me. I'm convinced the writing is on the wall with sculpting, at least for any type of military figure. 3D scanning has made it obsolete IMO. Plus the new digital version of recasting makes it a losing battle at this point. At least when it was resin copies made physically and shipped, there was some recourse, but now just email files of copies to be printed, it's game over. I'll just paint at this point, can't copy that and sculpt solely for my own pleasure.

Jeff, Anybody that can sculpt like you, can paint well. That wasn't even a question. Art generally is all encompassing. If you can paint, you can sculpt, if you can sculpt, you can draw, if you can draw, you can create exceptional models. Now, I am all ears about that Zeiss microscope. My eyes have been around almost 80 years and, I have macular Degeneration ro make it even worse. What do those cost? And where would you get one?

The later photos are incredible! If I hadn't seen those, I wouldn't have believed it. 1/16 is a huge difference than 1/35th. I have never seen a 1/35th scale face that good! And I have seen the best of the best in Europe, Asia and North America and, with a magnifying glass. I'm serious!

:notworthynotworthy:notworthynotworthy:notworthynotworthy:notworthynotworthy:notworthynotworthy:notworthynotworthy:notworthy

Bob
 

ausf

Master at Arms
Thanks again Bob, way too kind.

Yeah, I worked with a guy about 30 years who would ask every perspective sculptor one question 'Can you draw?' If they answered yes, he'd hire them. If they said, 'no', 'not my thing' or some other reason, no matter how nice a portfolio, he'd pass on them.

It's all 1/35, there's no 1/16 in there.

The scope isn't Zeiss, I have a Zeiss headloupe, but not the scope, I can't imagine what a Zeiss scope would cost. Yikes.

The company is Amscope in CA. They import most of the microscopes in the US. This is their rebranded inspection scope with zoom. They have a whole line of them, I wanted one that you could mount a Canon Rebel to. It was around $220 shipped I believe, I can check. Entry level, but sturdy as hell.

I 3D printed and built a light ring, but they are cheap enough to buy at the same time and if you wanted to mount a camera, would need the proper mount for yours, about another $100 or so. you can also get a camera made for microscopes.

Theres a whole rabbit hole to fall into once you start looking at them, but you could easily get started for $200 and use a worklamp. Just look at inspection scopes around 7-45X.

I now use it for everything, even masking. Plus you'll really see flaws in paint, etc that may change the way you airbrush, it did for me. I hand painted the 1/72 Zero canopy, it was easier than masking, so I went for it.
 
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