Modelers Alliance Logon

Modelersalliance Tip Jar

 

Reviews and News

 

Verlinden Productions WWII German Tools

alt
The new etched sets from Verlinden Productions are 'connection less" meaning one does not need to cut them from the fret.  On the upper right, you can see the blue-green film which holds the items in place.  The lower right is an extreme close-up showing the Krupp Werk brand to the wrenches.

alt
The upper photos offer two views of the film being removed.  The lower right is another detail image of a wrench while the lower left shows one of the tool boxes (with lid) soldered.  It still needs some clean up but the lid is functional.

It is a nice and easy to use set which is quite affordable!  It is highly recommended although no mention is made of the hinge pins for the tool boxes which one must make from wire.

Regards,

Buildings made of Styrofoam

Hello

Well, the vacum forming of the bath tub was the first step on my new project, next out is a small building. The scale is 1/25 but this technique is usable in any scale.

Got very inspired after I read an article of Marc Reusser and Don Railton on how they made buildings out of styrofoam. The technique is to carve the bricks into the soft styrofoam using an x-acto knife.

The starting point..
alt
Lines were scribed using an x-acto

Read more: Buildings made of Styrofoam

Discuss this article in the forums (3 replies).

Some ancient builds, a Canadian CMP C-60L mobile Workshop from '83

As with the Dingo, In the summer of 1983, I had just received a lot of notoriety for "The Winds of War" diorama the previous year. At the time, I was hearing feed back from my friends that there were those who said I couldn't possibly compete with the best armor builders in America. I just wasn't good enough. Judging from the vehicles in the Winds of War, they were right. However, in that year I had learned a lot! I was like a sponge, soaking up every detail and technique out there. At the time the three best were from the midwest, where I was from. I won't mention their names as it no longer matters, but they were the armor model gods of that time.

I decided I would really take my time and make a couple of armor pieces that could compete with them. My second choice was a Canadian CMP, Canadian Military Pattern), C-60L mobile workshop.. At the time and even today, there are only two CMP models on the market. The Italeri 15 cwt and the Tamiya Quad Gun Tractor. These simulate both patterns of the CMP, and I used parts from both. We went to Europe that spring and I was able to extensively photograph both vehicles, so I had my research plus a couple of books on each I picked up at the book stalls in London.

I chose it because it was an extremely busy vehicle and really unique. To my knowledge, (I could have missed it somewhere), this is the only model of this particular vehicle ever built. I still have one of the photos that got me interested. While building this, I discovered two cutting edge technologies first found in the model railroad products and I thought I had just discovered a whole new way to add detail.

alt

Read more: Some ancient builds, a Canadian CMP C-60L mobile Workshop from '83

Some ancient builds, a Daimler Dingo from '83

In the summer of 1983, I had just received a lot of notoriety for "The Winds of War" diorama the previous year. At the time, I was hearing feed back from my friends that there were those who said I couldn't possibly compete with the best armor builders in America. I just wasn't good enough. Judging from the vehicles in the Winds of War, they were right. However, in that year I had learned a lot! I was like a sponge, soaking up every detail and technique out there. At the time the three best were from the midwest, where I was from. I won't mention their names as it no longer matters, but they were the armor model gods of that time.

I decided I would really take my time and make a couple of armor pieces that could compete with them. My first choice was a Daimler Dingo scout car. At the time it was a relatively new release. We went to Europe that spring and I was able to extensively photograph both vehicles, so I had my research plus a couple of books on each I picked up at the book stalls in London.

The Dingo I photographed had a really complex radio that in 1/35th scale would be tiny. Try to remember that at that time there was no photoetch of any kind for either armor or aircraft. All the brass, aluminum, etc. was from sheets and tubes. I began with the radio. Please forgive the photography, I had a cheap SLR with no macro at the time.

It took over a hundred scratched parts to create this. I kept count of everything as back then, everybody made a sort of reference scrapbook that was laid next to the model in competition. The judges used them to tell how much was actually done in highly updated and upgraded models. I had plenty of pictures of this radio so I built it from them, all the time carefully test fitting it to the Dingo so to be sure it would fit when complete.

alt
The painted and weathered radio. This will illustrate the size.

Read more: Some ancient builds, a Daimler Dingo from '83

Scratch building a Railroad Bridge A piece of nostalgia!

Back in the early 80s, I had been taking a lot of step by step pics as I built models to later put together a book. They were all taken in black & white as magazines back then only printed in black and white! (Hard to believe, isn’t it?). After the “Winds of War” my first huge diorama, had made a stir when it was on the cover of Fine Scale Modeler’s second issue, they had made me an offer to do other articles and to publish a book. A few months later, they had some internal problems, this was in ‘83-'84. They contacted me and said that corporate had blocked all books for the next year. Not much later, I met my future partner and he suggested I let him do the book instead. I agreed and the result was “Superdioramas”. Verlinden was one of the first, if not the first, to print every page of a modeling book or magazine in full color, so, I have hundreds of unpublished B&W photographs that have been in a box for over a quarter century. I had an idea to start a thread using those photographs. If you guys like it, this is kind of an experiment, then I will do more. I will begin with the giant stone railroad bridge in the diorama, “Legacies”. Hope you like it!

Bob

The bridge is in 1/35th scale, but in real size, it stands almost two feet high, (610 mm). I built this in a similar process as I build most of my structures. I begin with a corrugated cardboard shape constructed with white glue. I buy my own 4 X 8 sheets today, but, back then, I used boxes found at the rear of most supermarkets. BTW, with all materials involved, I probably spent less than $20 on this. That might make a down payment on a layaway plan for a 1/35th tank now! It is a very cheap way to build buildings even today.

Here is the shape I created. I always make the base first, then lay out the streets/sidewalks and alleys. That gives me the dimensions for the buildings.

alt

Read more: Scratch building a Railroad Bridge A piece of nostalgia!

Discuss this article in the forums (552 replies).

Subcategories