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MODELING A LATE WAR VEHICLE IN RED PRIMER (AND MIXING WITH OTHER COLORS) Part 2

PART2
FAIDED/Damaged LATE WAR PANZER GREEN.
There is quite a bit of debate over this late war Green and the color would vary considerably between applications, at this stage of the war. I prefer the look to be lighter rather than darker and this seems to match the color photos of these vehicles that I have seen. However, I also like other more green applications as well. It just depends on what 'turns you on'.
So, next was the ghost coat with Testors Panzer Olive Green, to give it that worn and faided start to the detailing stage. This is an enamel based paint so make sure that you have sealed the acrylic first. This stage fades off the green, so if you want to acheive some variation, an application of maskol chipping works well before this coat is applied. Once again, do not make this a solid coat of paint. After this has dried, peel off the maskol from all areas of the model (tip - use masking tape joined in a ring around your hand - the wider the better). I did not apply the Green to all wheels as this seemed to be the trend at the end with late war stuff. Each wheel was painted independantly, utilised from an older vehicle or pre-existing stock at the factory.
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RED PRIMER FINISHING ON THE TURRET AND NOMINATED PLATES.
The turret is looking nice but has very little interest as it has a flat surface with no detail as yet. What makes an armor model interesting is the modellers ability to capture that realism and subtle variation. I use artist oils to achieve this, combined with pigments and pastels. I usually mix my own but MIG has come out with a couple of good colors for Primer in his new oil paint range that save me a lot of work in creating the base oil color. I vary the details of this color by mixing black or white to the base color as well as a light sand color. I also use other types of Red to achieve variation. (see photo)
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The colors here are a light variation of Scarlet, Light Red (the one from AS is the best shade out of the tube), and the 502 range from MIG - Primer Red and Brick Red. The LIGHT RED is perfect for this particular application, as the Terracotta look is good for a battle worn and faided Primer surface. The Mig primer is better for small areas in this application rather than the base color. I used the MIG color for my 17cm Grille however, because the color is more suited to a new base coat that has not detiorated. The brush's also help, for the faided aplication I use the Round,the Angle and large Angle for general application and the Medium for the small ones. The main consideration for my method with the oil paint stage is time. This part must be completed while all the colors are wet and because they are applied in thin coats you do not have as much time as normal (with oils). I would estimate about 8 hours in summer and maybe 1 1/2 days in winter if it was a cold room without a heater. The colors need to mix with the base to achieve a subtle look as well as pastel application over the wet oils.
VERY FINE DETAIL BRUSHES AS USED FOR FIGURES EYES OR CHIPS ARE USED FOR ALL THE VERY SMALL DETAIL WORK.
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The Turret is painted in an overall application of AS light red, making sure that there is only just enough to cover your base coat (not thick). To have a 'nice light touch' at this stage is critical, so wipe the brush off on a rag then apply to the tank. You can always add more if it's not enough.
After the turret is given a light coating with the light red , I then set about slowly thinning and removing it with a dry clean brush. This needs to be wiped on a dry rag frequently. Obviously you don't want to take it all away but you do want to have some influence from the acrylic reds you have applied previously. I then use the darker browns such as burnt umber and sienna for dark staining and yellow ochre plus white for the lighter shallow chips, that have not taken enough to get an edge. Dark brown can then be added on selected deeper chips that have gone to the steel to simulate rust. More recent small scratchs are also done with light and medium greys. I then dry brush with a yellow ochre plus white to bring up certain details and edges. The really faided areas I apply dust straight to the wet oil base coat. This achieves a double effect,
1. it enables the use of pigments without any medium for drying as the pigment soaks up the oils and dries with the oil paint base.
2. The pigment is slightly affected by the oil base color and adopts some of the color when drying, giving a more real blend. Be careful doing this though, as it requires judgement and a soft touch, gained from experience. It can destroy your progress if you are heavy handed or miss judge the correct positioning .
The same is applied to the body using the dust and faided Green pigments on the oils while they are wet. The darker colors are especially good, as once the pigmants are applied a very light application of the base color (in oil) over the pigment can achieve some marvelous faiding and rubbed dust effects, as well as general deterioration. Chips are then added last, in the usual way. bounce I haven't added my rust to the chips as yet, so I apologise that these photos don't show that effect. They can be observed though on Jose's or Sergiusz's work here at TNT, to great effect and skill.
THIS THEN COVERS A LATE WAR , BATTLE WORN SUBJECT. PART 3 WILL BE ON END OF WAR EXPERIMENTAL SUBJECTS AND COLOR APPLICATION.
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THANKS FOR READING AND i HOPE YOU HAVE ENJOYED, BEEN ENTERTAINED AND LEARN'T SOMETHING NEW.

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