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TOPIC: Airbrushing Question

Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 13:27 #13

How high is your air pressure at the compressor ?

Regards, Christian B)

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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 14:50 #14

I have a decent 2 cylinder airbrush compressor with a tank. It powers up to about 90 psi and kicks in periodically when I am using it. There is a small presure regulator with a moisture trap on the outlet that I keep at about 25 psi. Then I have a small inline moisture trap about 2 inches away from the airbrush with a small Pasche needle valve air regulator where the hose attaches to the airbrush.

I regulate the airflow through the airbrush at the needle valve and while it isn't real accurate for precise pressure it works quite well. To date I have yet to ever find any moistre in the trap at the airbrush or the trap on the tank outlet. I have had to drain the moisture out of the tank but it is minimal usually.
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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 14:56 #15

Ok, I was asking Mike the question ,since he is the one with the problem .

Regards, Christian B)

Last Edit: 04 Aug 2017 14:58 by phantom II.
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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 14:58 #16

I knew that but thought I would describe my setup as it has been fairly trouble free.
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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 16:29 #17

phantom II wrote:
Ok, I was asking Mike the question ,since he is the one with the problem .

Regards, Christian B)

Good, thought you might have been asking me. :huh: :woohoo:
I told you photobucket sucks...



"If you don't like it why don't you just let it be"
Hank Williams Jr.
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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 17:10 #18

moon puppy wrote:
phantom II wrote:
Ok, I was asking Mike the question ,since he is the one with the problem .

Regards, Christian B)

Good, thought you might have been asking me. :huh: :woohoo:


And why would you think that ? Only one person in this blog was asking for an answer to his problem . :idonno

Cheers, Christian :rotf

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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 21:09 #19

First off all - This is just another example of what I love about this site, my little question has turned into a little round table discussion about airbrushing, which will probably help more then just me!
Iron Mike wrote:
Mike, do you have a compressor with a tank? If so, you need to drain that tank frequently during humid times. I take mine outside in the grass to drain it, the water is usually rusty and will stain concrete. I let the pressure build up until the compressor cuts off, then open the drain valve on the bottom of the tank slowly at first, then all the way to let the air force the water out. You'd be amazed at how much is in there. :ohmy: :pinch:
B)

I have an Iwata compressor Mike, with out the tank. I do keep my pig 30 gallon compressor open so that the water doesn't pool in it. Avoids what happened to Chuk. Here is a photo of my setup.


hf291f7c.JPG





ausf wrote:
Besides humidity, the act of compression heats up the air. High humidity could be overwhelming the trap, but you could also be getting condensation in the hose after the trap.

Iwata makes a nice pistol grip trap, but you can also get one of those cheap traps for the base of the AB since you're only trying to cut down on the residual stuff.

I was plagued by what you're getting, I was using a sizable MT at the compressor, not an AB one, but the type you'd get from Home Depot. I added a cheapo ($3) trap at the base of the AB and problem was solved.

I eventually switched over to an Iwata SmartJet compressor that came with a nice trap/gauge and I haven't had an issue since. It may be Iwata uses a very narrow line post trap or that the trap is so efficient, but I haven't needed the added one at the brush.

Nothing is worse that doing a tight camo pattern and you get that water loogie out of nowhere.

That is basically the setup I have sans the MT at the airbrush. I ordered one so hopefully in a week or so, I'll have this licked. And yeah - My freehand camo job, took a bit of a beating from the sputtering. Fortunately I still need to add another color so I can hopefully get it cleaned up.



phantom II wrote:
How high is your air pressure at the compressor ?

Regards, Christian B)

I've been between 20 and 30 psi Christian.

I appreciate all the help guys. I think we've pretty much confirmed what i was thinking. I've ordered a new trap for the airbrush side, and I am thinking of replacing the vinyl hose from Iwata with a fabric covered one, to see if that helps make any difference. I'm also going to get some beeswax to seal up the brush a little bit. All of this my help out in general.

Otherwise, I'll need to keep my painting sessions under 20 minutes at a time on those humid days.

Thanks
Mike
Last Edit: 04 Aug 2017 21:10 by Skinny_Mike.
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Airbrushing Question 04 Aug 2017 22:13 #20

Skinny_Mike wrote:
First off all - This is just another example of what I love about this site, my little question has turned into a little round table discussion about airbrushing, which will probably help more then just me!
Iron Mike wrote:
Mike, do you have a compressor with a tank? If so, you need to drain that tank frequently during humid times. I take mine outside in the grass to drain it, the water is usually rusty and will stain concrete. I let the pressure build up until the compressor cuts off, then open the drain valve on the bottom of the tank slowly at first, then all the way to let the air force the water out. You'd be amazed at how much is in there. :ohmy: :pinch:
B)

I have an Iwata compressor Mike, with out the tank. I do keep my pig 30 gallon compressor open so that the water doesn't pool in it. Avoids what happened to Chuk. Here is a photo of my setup.


hf291f7c.JPG





ausf wrote:
Besides humidity, the act of compression heats up the air. High humidity could be overwhelming the trap, but you could also be getting condensation in the hose after the trap.

Iwata makes a nice pistol grip trap, but you can also get one of those cheap traps for the base of the AB since you're only trying to cut down on the residual stuff.

I was plagued by what you're getting, I was using a sizable MT at the compressor, not an AB one, but the type you'd get from Home Depot. I added a cheapo ($3) trap at the base of the AB and problem was solved.

I eventually switched over to an Iwata SmartJet compressor that came with a nice trap/gauge and I haven't had an issue since. It may be Iwata uses a very narrow line post trap or that the trap is so efficient, but I haven't needed the added one at the brush.

Nothing is worse that doing a tight camo pattern and you get that water loogie out of nowhere.

That is basically the setup I have sans the MT at the airbrush. I ordered one so hopefully in a week or so, I'll have this licked. And yeah - My freehand camo job, took a bit of a beating from the sputtering. Fortunately I still need to add another color so I can hopefully get it cleaned up.



phantom II wrote:
How high is your air pressure at the compressor ?

Regards, Christian B)

I've been between 20 and 30 psi Christian.

I appreciate all the help guys. I think we've pretty much confirmed what i was thinking. I've ordered a new trap for the airbrush side, and I am thinking of replacing the vinyl hose from Iwata with a fabric covered one, to see if that helps make any difference. I'm also going to get some beeswax to seal up the brush a little bit. All of this my help out in general.

Otherwise, I'll need to keep my painting sessions under 20 minutes at a time on those humid days.

Thanks
Mike


Hmmm ? I'm not sure why you have such a problem Mike . We have a lot of humidity here but I never have issues either. No filters either... :idonno

I have two compressors . One that runs 150 PSI with a tank. That one needs draining.
The other, an ancient Badger which maxes out at 35 PSI. Never notice any moisture in that air supply.

I thought maybe your compressors ran at a higher PSI. like 150 or above

There is a bigger chance of having moisture when running higher pressures, as it forms in the process of decompressing the gasses.

IE: 1. from the compressor to the tank . While going from the tank through the regulator and while going from the airline through the orifice of the airbrush itself . ( Don't know of a cure for that one ).

Anyhow, this is not a cure but it gives you some places to try and filter the moisture .
The more you get out just downstream of the compressor , the better off you are further down.

Hope the trap is enough to cure the problem

Chapstick will work instead of bee's wax.

Cheers, Christian B)

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Airbrushing Question 05 Aug 2017 07:47 #21

Skinny_Mike wrote:



ausf wrote:
Besides humidity, the act of compression heats up the air. High humidity could be overwhelming the trap, but you could also be getting condensation in the hose after the trap.

Iwata makes a nice pistol grip trap, but you can also get one of those cheap traps for the base of the AB since you're only trying to cut down on the residual stuff.

I was plagued by what you're getting, I was using a sizable MT at the compressor, not an AB one, but the type you'd get from Home Depot. I added a cheapo ($3) trap at the base of the AB and problem was solved.

I eventually switched over to an Iwata SmartJet compressor that came with a nice trap/gauge and I haven't had an issue since. It may be Iwata uses a very narrow line post trap or that the trap is so efficient, but I haven't needed the added one at the brush.

Nothing is worse that doing a tight camo pattern and you get that water loogie out of nowhere.

That is basically the setup I have sans the MT at the airbrush. I ordered one so hopefully in a week or so, I'll have this licked. And yeah - My freehand camo job, took a bit of a beating from the sputtering. Fortunately I still need to add another color so I can hopefully get it cleaned up.

Once I bought the SJ, I haven't needed to use the AB side trap, but I also no longer spray when the humid. I keep a hygrometer in the shop since urethane resin is so moisture sensitive that I don't crack the containers when it's 60% or above.

I'm sure if you had to wait for under 60% in FLA, you'd have to find a new hobby, but I bet the pistol trap will solve it. It couldn't hurt to try shortening the Iwata hose before you went for the braided. They give you a ridiculously long hose with the SJ setup. I guess it makes sense if you're walking around painting details on a car or something, but as is with the compressor close it's more in the way than not.
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Airbrushing Question 18 Aug 2017 09:11 #22

Hi guys - yesterday I had an opportunity for an extended spray session with the new inline moisture trap installed. Humidity was up around 80%. I had none of my previously reported issues. Looks like I may have this one solved.

I also sealed the nozzle end with some chap stick and no bubbling of the paint occurred. This has happened in the past.

Thank you all for the help!

Should have some photos of my Tiger up this weekend.
Mike
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Airbrushing Question 18 Aug 2017 11:02 #23

I one hundred the moisture trap solution. For everybody that uses a tank, rust cannot form under pressure. If you keep your tank at one PSI, no rust will form.
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Airbrushing Question 18 Aug 2017 11:22 #24

Robertp wrote:
I one hundred the moisture trap solution. For everybody that uses a tank, rust cannot form under pressure. If you keep your tank at one PSI, no rust will form.


I have a hard time believing this. Here are the reasons.

Scuba diving tanks are never kept without some air pressure in them .

They are always filled with mechanically dried as well as chemically dried air .

All that said, they must pass a hydrostatic test yearly and repaired if necessary . Upon which time they are recertified as usable .

I do agree that keeping some pressure in the tank will help prevent corrosion damage if the moisture is drained everyday that it is used .

Just a little practical info. :)

Cheers, Christian B)

Last Edit: 18 Aug 2017 11:23 by phantom II.
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